25 June 2018

Population and family size – tapping into the zeitgeist?

The past few months have seen an unprecedented level of attention on population and family size in the media. With articles in The Times, the Washington Post, the New York TimesThe Guardian, the BBC, and many other outlets, could it be that this long-neglected issue is finally getting the attention it deserves?

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24 April 2018

Big (royal) families are behind the times

The announcement of the pregnancy of the Duchess of Cambridge last year was greeted with criticism, as well as congratulations. Population Matters offered our own comment in the national media.

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9 January 2018

Imams support family planning in Senegal

Public health officials and NGOs in Senegal turn to mosques to expand the provision of family planning, The Christian Science Monitor reports. A key first step, results indicate.

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17 August 2017

Global initiatives support smaller families

Accelerated population growth poses major challenges worldwide, especially for countries with high growth and few resources to cope. In response to these pressures, initiatives across the globe are underway to provide people with the knowledge and tools they need to help turn the tide of overpopulation.

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21 July 2017

Smaller families most effective action on global warming

Last week, researchers from Lund University and University of British Columbia published a widely-reported article highlighting the top ‘high-impact’ actions individuals can take to reduce their carbon emissions and fight climate change. They concluded that having fewer children would have the greatest impact over the long term.

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9 December 2016

Panic and pragmatism: population in Korea and Japan

South Korea’s official statistics agency has just announced that it expects the country’s population to shrink by 8 million over the next 50 years. Currently around  50 million, the agency projects that the population will peak at 52.96 million in 2031 and then gradually decline to 43 million in 2065.

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